A Pair Of Bald Eagles Seen Building A Nest In New York For The First Time In A Century.

A pair of bald eagles have been spotted in a nest on the south shore of Staten Island — the first time in 100 years the once-endangered birds have built a home in New York City.

The New York City Audubon reported that, following an unusual winter in which the iconic birds were observed in all five boroughs of New York, there were sightings in February of a pair in a nest on the north shore of Staten Island.

That turned out to be premature, according to the environmental group, however the latest report — this one from the other side of the island — has now been confirmed. The precise site of the nest has not been disclosed to protect the eagles from disturbance.

1. A resident bald eagle at Staten Island, NY.

A Pair Of Bald Eagles Seen Building A Nest In New York For The First Time In A Century.

Bird watchers have named the male bird “Vito” and add that the female seems to be incubating eggs.

In the 1800s and early 1900s, New York was home to more than 70 nesting pairs of bald eagles. Furthermore, the city was the chosen wintering grounds of several hundred pairs.

However, the decline of waterfowl, shorebirds, and other prey all took their toll on the eagle population in New York, as it did elsewhere. Their situation got even worse after World War II, with the introduction of the pesticide DDT and to a lesser degree lead poisoning.

By 1960, only one pair of eagles was still nesting in all of New York.

2. Bird watchers have named the male bird “Vito” and add that the female seems to be incubating eggs.

A Pair Of Bald Eagles Seen Building A Nest In New York For The First Time In A Century.

3. A pair of bald eagles have been spotted in a nest on the south shore of Staten Island — the first time in 100 years the once-endangered birds have built a home in New York City.

A Pair Of Bald Eagles Seen Building A Nest In New York For The First Time In A Century.

In the 1970s, the state of New York launched a program to bring back the iconic bird. Between 1976 and 1988, biologists collected 198 nestling bald eagles, primarily from Alaska.

The birds were transported to suitable habitats in New York, given food until they became accustomed to the new environment and eventually released when they were able to fly.

By 2010, 173 pairs of bald eagles had been counted and their population is growing.

4. By 1960, only one pair of eagles was still nesting in all of New York.

A Pair Of Bald Eagles Seen Building A Nest In New York For The First Time In A Century.

Source: Audubon.

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