A Video Shows What It Looks Like When An Adult Gets Chickenpox.

Most of us suffer from chickenpox as children and few have any memories of the experience. But a graphic new video shows what it looks like when the virus hits as an adult.

The footage shows a 32-year-old man, from London, whose entire body is covered in huge and painful-looking white pustules.

The man holds a camera close to his skin to better capture the enormous blisters.

We see pus-filled whiteheads covering his back and his shoulders are also completely covered in red scabs.

The man, who uploaded the video on YouTube under the user name Harris82, has not identified himself and is not showing his face, but he is zooming in on his spot-covered forehead.

Chickenpox, or varicella, is a highly contagious disease and can be easily caught from someone infected.

It causes a rash of red, itchy spots which turn into blisters filled with fluid, as shown in the video. They crust into scabs and eventually fall off.

1. The 32-year-old man uploaded a video showing a horrific case of adult chickenpox, in which his entire body is covered in huge, white, fluid-filled blisters.

A Video Shows What It Looks Like When An Adult Gets Chickenpox.

Chickenpox is a mild illness in childhood and is so common that more than 90 percent of adults are immune because they’ve had it at an early age.

However, if it does develop in adults, chickenpox is much more severe and sufferers have a higher risk of developing complications.

Adults who suffer from the illness may be prescribed Aciclovir — an antiviral medicine, which has to be started within 24 hours of the rash appearing.

2. We see pus-filled whiteheads covering his back and his shoulders are also completely covered in red scabs.

A Video Shows What It Looks Like When An Adult Gets Chickenpox.

Aciclovir does not cure chickenpox, but makes its symptoms less acute.

There is a vaccine for chickenpox, however it is only given to children and adults who are particularly vulnerable to complications.

Vulnerable people include pregnant women, newborn babies and those with a weakened immune system.

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