‘It Shouldn’t Be An Issue At All.’ An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers In Multiple Precincts Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

A stunning undercover video has captured election officials in North Carolina offering ballots a wanna-be voter, who also happens to be a non U.S. citizen, without bothering to confirm his identity. When he asks them whether it would be OK to vote, they all say “yes”.

Guerrilla filmmaker James O’Keefe went to more than 20 voting precincts in Raleigh, Durham and Greensboro, N.C., giving the names of people who rarely vote, so he could test the integrity of the election process. Judging by the footage, it failed on a massive scale.

“I just sign this and then I can vote?”, O’Keefe asked one poll worker. “Yep”, was the swift reply. In all, O’Keefe was offered twenty ballots at the polling places he went to, before a couple of officials finally challenged him. In a video, released for The Daily Mail, O’Keefe says:

They wanted to protect the system. They had to break the rules to do it. Of all of the undercover investigations I’ve conducted, this was by far the easiest. They were willing to pass out fraudulently obtained ballots like it was Halloween candy.

After a lawsuit from the Obama administration and a series of appeals, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last month that the North Carolina is entitled to make voters prove who they are, but that provision of the law won’t go into effect until 2016. (Scroll down for the video.)

1. In precinct after precinct, North Carolina election officials confirmed that anyone can participate there on Election Day without proving he or she is eligible to vote.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

2. In all, 20 locations offered to let an undercover impostor vote on the same day he turned up with only someone else’s name and address.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

3. North Carolina is one of 33 states — plus the District of Columbia — where voters can cast ballots long before election day, and one of 19 states where people can vote without showing any documents whatsoever. In 2016, however, an aggressive voter ID law will take effect in the Tarheel State.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

4. Guerrilla videographer James O’Keefe went to polling places in three North Carolina cities, posing as people who records show hadn’t voted in ages.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

5. Election officials offered O’Keefe forms to sign and promised they would let him vote (he never actually signed forms, voted, or claimed to be the people whose names he was using).

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

6. Helpful election workers are following the law by opening the voting booth to all comers, but in 2016 the system will be turned on its head.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

7. One poll worker realized that the name and address O’Keefe offered belonged to someone who hadn’t voted in a long time — but he actually broke the law by insisting on seeing identification.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

8. In North Carolina, as in 18 other states and five US territories, no identification at all is required before people exercise their right to vote in the 2014 congressional midterm elections.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

9. Some civil rights activists insist a move to require IDs at the polls is rooted in anti-black prejudice, but the late South African President Nelson Mandela advocated the same policy at the start of the African National Congress 1999 election campaign.

'It Shouldn't Be An Issue At All.' An Undercover Investigator Films North Carolina Poll Workers Helping A Non-Citizen To Vote.

Here is the video — make of it what you will:

Share James O’Keefe’s video with your friends and share your thoughts in the comments below.