Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam’s Dog-Meat Industry.

Thousands of dogs are stolen from their owners’ homes every year to be sold to restaurants and served to diners for whom dog meat is a delicacy, we learn from a new documentary from Channel 4’s, titled Unreported World. In all, seven tons of live dogs are delivered to the capital Hanoi every day.

Because dogs are sold by weight, they are tightly packed in cages and force-fed through funnels to bulk up before being hosed down. Just one of these operations processes about 2,000 live dogs every day, cramming up to 200 into each cage. Once shipped to Hanoi, the dogs are placed in deep pits before being slaughtered and sold to restaurants to be cooked. Kieu Vu, the owner of one slaughter house, told Channel 4 that he slaughters up to 30 dogs a day.

Incredibly, although there are rules in Vietnam for the humane slaughter of other animals, including cattle, pigs and poultry, there are none for dogs and the documentary shows how the dogs are killed — one animal is shown being beaten to the head until it died. Two dog snatchers who were interviewed for the program said that they earned up to $100 a night by stealing pets. One of them said that he had stolen more than 3,000 dogs in seven years. If caught by police, dog thieves get off with small fines, as a dog’s value is not enough to send them to prison. Moreover, officials have rejected putting them in prison, saying Vietnam’s jails are too crowded as they are.

However, victims of the dog trade have formed lynch mobs in villages to defend their pets. In the village of N-hi Trung, for example, 20 dog thieves have reportedly been killed over the past five years and many more have been beaten up. Villagers had no qualms admitted beating two dog thieves to death, although they said they just wanted to hurt them.

The huge demand for fresh dog meat and the diminished supply from overseas has led to a huge increase in the number of dog thefts in Vietnam. Many diners believe that the more a dog suffers before it dies, the tastier its meat is. Acting on that belief, dogs are typically bludgeoned to death with a metal pipe, which often takes more than ten blows. Dog meat is quite expensive and can sell for up to $50 a dish in high-end restaurants in Hanoi. (Scroll down for the video.)

1. Snatched from their homes, crammed into metal cages and force-fed for restaurant tables, these animals are the victims of Vietnam’s booming dog-meat industry.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

2. Thousands of pets are stolen from gardens and front porches every year to feed the appetites of diners who treat dog meat as a delicacy.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

3. Documentary makers from Channel 4’s Unreported World found that seven tonnes of live dogs are shipped to the nation’s capital Hanoi every day.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

4. Many are stolen by thieves like these who drive round the streets at night on mopeds using lassos to catch unsuspecting pets.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

5. Because they are sold by weight, they are force fed through funnels to increase their value before being hosed down and tightly packed in cages.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

6. One busy holding house processes around 2,000 live dogs every day, with up to 200 squashed into each cage.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

7. Once they arrive in Hanoi, the dogs are stored in deep pits before being slaughtered and sold on to restaurants to be cooked and eaten.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

8. The owner of one slaughter house, Kieu Vu, told the documentary makers he slaughters up to 30 dogs a day.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

9. Although there are rules for the humane slaughter of cattle, pigs and poultry in Vietnam, there are none for dogs and one animal was shown suffering repeated blows to the head before it died.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

10. The documentary makers interviewed two dog snatchers (not pictured) who said they earned up to $100 a night by stealing pets. One boasted he had stolen more than 3,000 dogs in seven years.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

11. If they are caught by police, the thieves get off with small fines as the value of a dog is not enough to send them to prison. Officials have rejected tougher punishments for the crime, saying Vietnam’s jails are too crowded to fit all the dog thieves.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

12. Some diners believe the more an animal suffers before it dies, the tastier its meat is. They are usually bludgeoned to death with a heavy metal pipe, often taking more than ten blows.

Stolen From Their Homes And Beaten To Death Before Being Cooked At Restaurants: A Look Inside Vietnam's Dog-Meat Industry.

And here a video exposing the dog meat trade:

Source: Channel 4.

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