Try As They Might, Scientist Can’t Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

Every now and then something inexplicable will show up somewhere in a remote and inaccessible part of the Earth. It’s like whatever (or whoever) caused those things didn’t want us to know what it is.

Well, that’s exactly how this new discovery feels like, which is why an expedition is rushed tomorrow to investigate. The puzzle at issue is a giant hole — possibly up to 262 feet wide — that has somehow appeared in the Yamal Peninsula of the gas-rich northern Siberian region of Russia. The The Siberian Times reported:

A scientific team has been sent to investigate the hole and is due to arrive at the scene on Wednesday.

Ideas abound and, as might be expected, explanations like “the end of the world”, a UFO landing site, etc. have all been floated. One Russian expert has suggested as a probable cause the global warming gases released under the surface, which then explode like a champagne cork, leaving holes behind them. These, of course, are mere speculations.

A meteorite crater has also been suggested and promptly ruled out by a spokesman for Russia’s Emergencies Ministry’s Yamal branch:

We can definitely say that it is not a meteorite.

So, we are all in the dark right now, but this hole looks truly out of place there — just watch the video below! (Scroll down for the video.)

1. This enormous hole has appeared in a remote corner of Russia — and scientists are searching for answers.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

2. The enormous crater could be caused by global warming, with gas exploding below the surface.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

3. The crater has appeared in Yamal — a part of Siberia whose name translates as ‘the end of the world’.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

4. Expedition teams are on their way to the site, hoping to work out the cause of the crater.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

5. The mysterious hole is in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Region, some 20 miles from the Bovanenkovo gas field.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

6. Yamal is a corner of Russia far removed from the cities of St. Petersburg and Moscow.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

7. Yamal is is Russia’s main production area for gas supplied to Europe.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

8. Gas pipelines run through Yamal — but otherwise, in many places, there is little sign of life.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

9. One more outlandish theory suggests that the crater has been caused by the landing of a UFO.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

10. Scientists are hoping to announce their findings as to the cause of the hole in the next few days.

Try As They Might, Scientist Can't Explain This Giant Hole In Siberia. Not A Meteor Crater, But What Is It?

And here is the video:

Source: The Siberian Times.

Share this giant hole’s mystery with your friends below — they just might have a reasonable explanation for it.